We’ve been hard at work so updates have been slow.
News:
The illustrations have evolved into a comic!
Our car is customisable with paper templates. 
We’ve got a spiffy new logo
We’re launching a Kickstarter on Tuesday.
ZoomInfo
We’ve been hard at work so updates have been slow.
News:
The illustrations have evolved into a comic!
Our car is customisable with paper templates. 
We’ve got a spiffy new logo
We’re launching a Kickstarter on Tuesday.
ZoomInfo
We’ve been hard at work so updates have been slow.
News:
The illustrations have evolved into a comic!
Our car is customisable with paper templates. 
We’ve got a spiffy new logo
We’re launching a Kickstarter on Tuesday.
ZoomInfo

We’ve been hard at work so updates have been slow.

News:

The illustrations have evolved into a comic!

Our car is customisable with paper templates. 

We’ve got a spiffy new logo

We’re launching a Kickstarter on Tuesday.

We met after the completion of boat v.1 last week and recognised that if we provided this kit for our user testing it wouldn’t prove to be an accurate example of our services. The boat was made of foam to prevent it from sinking, but if we’re to dedicate to 4mm foam for every kit we’d be limited by the flimsy nature of the material. Did we really want to specialise in bath toys after this experience? No way. 
We want to focus on sturdier materials such like plywood and acrylic which will allow for more complex building projects. Although, our collaborator Ben tells us that parents would be put off by burnt edges created by laser-cutting machines (we’ve yet to test this) so we’re also going to try CNC milling. CNC would also open up more materials, different finishes and allow us to cut thicker pieces.
For the last week and a day, Shim has been building elastic band cars, Johanna has been pumping out illustrations of Jaguar e-types and Sam has been tweaking the branding to perfection. 
We’ve got a meeting with Bare Conductive on Wednesday so our next goal is to make a complete kit to present and hopefully catch some tips. 
ZoomInfo
We met after the completion of boat v.1 last week and recognised that if we provided this kit for our user testing it wouldn’t prove to be an accurate example of our services. The boat was made of foam to prevent it from sinking, but if we’re to dedicate to 4mm foam for every kit we’d be limited by the flimsy nature of the material. Did we really want to specialise in bath toys after this experience? No way. 
We want to focus on sturdier materials such like plywood and acrylic which will allow for more complex building projects. Although, our collaborator Ben tells us that parents would be put off by burnt edges created by laser-cutting machines (we’ve yet to test this) so we’re also going to try CNC milling. CNC would also open up more materials, different finishes and allow us to cut thicker pieces.
For the last week and a day, Shim has been building elastic band cars, Johanna has been pumping out illustrations of Jaguar e-types and Sam has been tweaking the branding to perfection. 
We’ve got a meeting with Bare Conductive on Wednesday so our next goal is to make a complete kit to present and hopefully catch some tips. 
ZoomInfo
We met after the completion of boat v.1 last week and recognised that if we provided this kit for our user testing it wouldn’t prove to be an accurate example of our services. The boat was made of foam to prevent it from sinking, but if we’re to dedicate to 4mm foam for every kit we’d be limited by the flimsy nature of the material. Did we really want to specialise in bath toys after this experience? No way. 
We want to focus on sturdier materials such like plywood and acrylic which will allow for more complex building projects. Although, our collaborator Ben tells us that parents would be put off by burnt edges created by laser-cutting machines (we’ve yet to test this) so we’re also going to try CNC milling. CNC would also open up more materials, different finishes and allow us to cut thicker pieces.
For the last week and a day, Shim has been building elastic band cars, Johanna has been pumping out illustrations of Jaguar e-types and Sam has been tweaking the branding to perfection. 
We’ve got a meeting with Bare Conductive on Wednesday so our next goal is to make a complete kit to present and hopefully catch some tips. 
ZoomInfo
We met after the completion of boat v.1 last week and recognised that if we provided this kit for our user testing it wouldn’t prove to be an accurate example of our services. The boat was made of foam to prevent it from sinking, but if we’re to dedicate to 4mm foam for every kit we’d be limited by the flimsy nature of the material. Did we really want to specialise in bath toys after this experience? No way. 
We want to focus on sturdier materials such like plywood and acrylic which will allow for more complex building projects. Although, our collaborator Ben tells us that parents would be put off by burnt edges created by laser-cutting machines (we’ve yet to test this) so we’re also going to try CNC milling. CNC would also open up more materials, different finishes and allow us to cut thicker pieces.
For the last week and a day, Shim has been building elastic band cars, Johanna has been pumping out illustrations of Jaguar e-types and Sam has been tweaking the branding to perfection. 
We’ve got a meeting with Bare Conductive on Wednesday so our next goal is to make a complete kit to present and hopefully catch some tips. 
ZoomInfo
We met after the completion of boat v.1 last week and recognised that if we provided this kit for our user testing it wouldn’t prove to be an accurate example of our services. The boat was made of foam to prevent it from sinking, but if we’re to dedicate to 4mm foam for every kit we’d be limited by the flimsy nature of the material. Did we really want to specialise in bath toys after this experience? No way. 
We want to focus on sturdier materials such like plywood and acrylic which will allow for more complex building projects. Although, our collaborator Ben tells us that parents would be put off by burnt edges created by laser-cutting machines (we’ve yet to test this) so we’re also going to try CNC milling. CNC would also open up more materials, different finishes and allow us to cut thicker pieces.
For the last week and a day, Shim has been building elastic band cars, Johanna has been pumping out illustrations of Jaguar e-types and Sam has been tweaking the branding to perfection. 
We’ve got a meeting with Bare Conductive on Wednesday so our next goal is to make a complete kit to present and hopefully catch some tips. 
ZoomInfo
We met after the completion of boat v.1 last week and recognised that if we provided this kit for our user testing it wouldn’t prove to be an accurate example of our services. The boat was made of foam to prevent it from sinking, but if we’re to dedicate to 4mm foam for every kit we’d be limited by the flimsy nature of the material. Did we really want to specialise in bath toys after this experience? No way. 
We want to focus on sturdier materials such like plywood and acrylic which will allow for more complex building projects. Although, our collaborator Ben tells us that parents would be put off by burnt edges created by laser-cutting machines (we’ve yet to test this) so we’re also going to try CNC milling. CNC would also open up more materials, different finishes and allow us to cut thicker pieces.
For the last week and a day, Shim has been building elastic band cars, Johanna has been pumping out illustrations of Jaguar e-types and Sam has been tweaking the branding to perfection. 
We’ve got a meeting with Bare Conductive on Wednesday so our next goal is to make a complete kit to present and hopefully catch some tips. 
ZoomInfo

We met after the completion of boat v.1 last week and recognised that if we provided this kit for our user testing it wouldn’t prove to be an accurate example of our services. The boat was made of foam to prevent it from sinking, but if we’re to dedicate to 4mm foam for every kit we’d be limited by the flimsy nature of the material. Did we really want to specialise in bath toys after this experience? No way. 

We want to focus on sturdier materials such like plywood and acrylic which will allow for more complex building projects. Although, our collaborator Ben tells us that parents would be put off by burnt edges created by laser-cutting machines (we’ve yet to test this) so we’re also going to try CNC milling. CNC would also open up more materials, different finishes and allow us to cut thicker pieces.

For the last week and a day, Shim has been building elastic band cars, Johanna has been pumping out illustrations of Jaguar e-types and Sam has been tweaking the branding to perfection. 

We’ve got a meeting with Bare Conductive on Wednesday so our next goal is to make a complete kit to present and hopefully catch some tips. 

Boat kit - Part 3
The instruction booklet contains a very brief history on steamboats and their role in Victorian Britain and 1800’s America. The booklet also explains the science behind potential energy and how steamships work. 
Johanna- ” I’ve never used a style like this before. We created a moodboard together: Sam’s taste for geometric, vector-based illustrations and my interest in designer toys struck the right style for the job. We took inspiration from Ben Newman and Amanda Visell’s art and tried to make it our own. I’ve seen flat illustrations and infographic styles before though I’ve always been put-off by the clean manufactured look of them. When preparing for the illustrations, I used thick globs of acrylic paint and light soapy washes to create texture samples. I took hi-res photos of these for pasting into Photoshop. 
Our process so far: 
I draw initial sketches via pen & paper. Sam takes these and traces them on Illustrator. I take the .ai files and colour/texture them on Photoshop. I pass them back to Sam and we look over them together, picking out any inconsistencies and adjusting colours ect. 
Smoothest professional partnership I’ve ever had :D”
ZoomInfo
Boat kit - Part 3
The instruction booklet contains a very brief history on steamboats and their role in Victorian Britain and 1800’s America. The booklet also explains the science behind potential energy and how steamships work. 
Johanna- ” I’ve never used a style like this before. We created a moodboard together: Sam’s taste for geometric, vector-based illustrations and my interest in designer toys struck the right style for the job. We took inspiration from Ben Newman and Amanda Visell’s art and tried to make it our own. I’ve seen flat illustrations and infographic styles before though I’ve always been put-off by the clean manufactured look of them. When preparing for the illustrations, I used thick globs of acrylic paint and light soapy washes to create texture samples. I took hi-res photos of these for pasting into Photoshop. 
Our process so far: 
I draw initial sketches via pen & paper. Sam takes these and traces them on Illustrator. I take the .ai files and colour/texture them on Photoshop. I pass them back to Sam and we look over them together, picking out any inconsistencies and adjusting colours ect. 
Smoothest professional partnership I’ve ever had :D”
ZoomInfo
Boat kit - Part 3
The instruction booklet contains a very brief history on steamboats and their role in Victorian Britain and 1800’s America. The booklet also explains the science behind potential energy and how steamships work. 
Johanna- ” I’ve never used a style like this before. We created a moodboard together: Sam’s taste for geometric, vector-based illustrations and my interest in designer toys struck the right style for the job. We took inspiration from Ben Newman and Amanda Visell’s art and tried to make it our own. I’ve seen flat illustrations and infographic styles before though I’ve always been put-off by the clean manufactured look of them. When preparing for the illustrations, I used thick globs of acrylic paint and light soapy washes to create texture samples. I took hi-res photos of these for pasting into Photoshop. 
Our process so far: 
I draw initial sketches via pen & paper. Sam takes these and traces them on Illustrator. I take the .ai files and colour/texture them on Photoshop. I pass them back to Sam and we look over them together, picking out any inconsistencies and adjusting colours ect. 
Smoothest professional partnership I’ve ever had :D”
ZoomInfo
Boat kit - Part 3
The instruction booklet contains a very brief history on steamboats and their role in Victorian Britain and 1800’s America. The booklet also explains the science behind potential energy and how steamships work. 
Johanna- ” I’ve never used a style like this before. We created a moodboard together: Sam’s taste for geometric, vector-based illustrations and my interest in designer toys struck the right style for the job. We took inspiration from Ben Newman and Amanda Visell’s art and tried to make it our own. I’ve seen flat illustrations and infographic styles before though I’ve always been put-off by the clean manufactured look of them. When preparing for the illustrations, I used thick globs of acrylic paint and light soapy washes to create texture samples. I took hi-res photos of these for pasting into Photoshop. 
Our process so far: 
I draw initial sketches via pen & paper. Sam takes these and traces them on Illustrator. I take the .ai files and colour/texture them on Photoshop. I pass them back to Sam and we look over them together, picking out any inconsistencies and adjusting colours ect. 
Smoothest professional partnership I’ve ever had :D”
ZoomInfo

Boat kit - Part 3


The instruction booklet contains a very brief history on steamboats and their role in Victorian Britain and 1800’s America. The booklet also explains the science behind potential energy and how steamships work. 

Johanna- ” I’ve never used a style like this before. We created a moodboard together: Sam’s taste for geometric, vector-based illustrations and my interest in designer toys struck the right style for the job. We took inspiration from Ben Newman and Amanda Visell’s art and tried to make it our own. I’ve seen flat illustrations and infographic styles before though I’ve always been put-off by the clean manufactured look of them. When preparing for the illustrations, I used thick globs of acrylic paint and light soapy washes to create texture samples. I took hi-res photos of these for pasting into Photoshop. 

Our process so far: 

I draw initial sketches via pen & paper. Sam takes these and traces them on Illustrator. I take the .ai files and colour/texture them on Photoshop. I pass them back to Sam and we look over them together, picking out any inconsistencies and adjusting colours ect. 

Smoothest professional partnership I’ve ever had :D”

Boat kit - Part 2
Ben has a go at building our first boat by following our instruction booklet. 
Our current model of boat is made from laser-cut foam re-enforced with standard lollipop sticks. Even the propeller is made from foam, though despite it being a floating material it still manages to paddle along with no trouble. 
ZoomInfo
Boat kit - Part 2
Ben has a go at building our first boat by following our instruction booklet. 
Our current model of boat is made from laser-cut foam re-enforced with standard lollipop sticks. Even the propeller is made from foam, though despite it being a floating material it still manages to paddle along with no trouble. 
ZoomInfo
Boat kit - Part 2
Ben has a go at building our first boat by following our instruction booklet. 
Our current model of boat is made from laser-cut foam re-enforced with standard lollipop sticks. Even the propeller is made from foam, though despite it being a floating material it still manages to paddle along with no trouble. 
ZoomInfo
Boat kit - Part 2
Ben has a go at building our first boat by following our instruction booklet. 
Our current model of boat is made from laser-cut foam re-enforced with standard lollipop sticks. Even the propeller is made from foam, though despite it being a floating material it still manages to paddle along with no trouble. 
ZoomInfo

Boat kit - Part 2

Ben has a go at building our first boat by following our instruction booklet. 

Our current model of boat is made from laser-cut foam re-enforced with standard lollipop sticks. Even the propeller is made from foam, though despite it being a floating material it still manages to paddle along with no trouble. 

Boat Kit - Part 1
A couple of dozen boats later…
We prototyped the hell out of this boat. Our objective was to create a boat using one tooled material, and as few store bought materials possible. 
We tried candle-powered steam, elastic-powered paddles, and soap propulsion. For each method, we tried a different material. 
The styles range from primitive minimalist to complex ornate- the trouble with choosing a direction is we still don’t really know how much to expect from a 10 year old. Could they neatly roll a square of card into a funnel/chimney? How long will they wait for glue to dry? Will they cut out their own pieces? We need to find ways to test skill level and patience. 
ZoomInfo
Boat Kit - Part 1
A couple of dozen boats later…
We prototyped the hell out of this boat. Our objective was to create a boat using one tooled material, and as few store bought materials possible. 
We tried candle-powered steam, elastic-powered paddles, and soap propulsion. For each method, we tried a different material. 
The styles range from primitive minimalist to complex ornate- the trouble with choosing a direction is we still don’t really know how much to expect from a 10 year old. Could they neatly roll a square of card into a funnel/chimney? How long will they wait for glue to dry? Will they cut out their own pieces? We need to find ways to test skill level and patience. 
ZoomInfo
Boat Kit - Part 1
A couple of dozen boats later…
We prototyped the hell out of this boat. Our objective was to create a boat using one tooled material, and as few store bought materials possible. 
We tried candle-powered steam, elastic-powered paddles, and soap propulsion. For each method, we tried a different material. 
The styles range from primitive minimalist to complex ornate- the trouble with choosing a direction is we still don’t really know how much to expect from a 10 year old. Could they neatly roll a square of card into a funnel/chimney? How long will they wait for glue to dry? Will they cut out their own pieces? We need to find ways to test skill level and patience. 
ZoomInfo

Boat Kit - Part 1

A couple of dozen boats later…

We prototyped the hell out of this boat. Our objective was to create a boat using one tooled material, and as few store bought materials possible. 

We tried candle-powered steam, elastic-powered paddles, and soap propulsion. For each method, we tried a different material. 

The styles range from primitive minimalist to complex ornate- the trouble with choosing a direction is we still don’t really know how much to expect from a 10 year old. Could they neatly roll a square of card into a funnel/chimney? How long will they wait for glue to dry? Will they cut out their own pieces? We need to find ways to test skill level and patience. 

Pic: The paper prototype for a tin put-put boat.
After a group chat, we noticed there were very steep obstacles to tackle when dealing with the put-put boat kit. 
The fire problem was first shrugged off because of the presence of water while the boat was in use.
Then our product designer Shim started calling manufacturers who specialised in diecutting, stamping and water cutting so we could produce foldable metal nets in tin/aluminium. One of the quotes for 1000 minimum quantity was £4.50pp  (est.) When we enquired about making a single diecutting tool for the net, they quoted us £2,100 estimate. This was becoming less of a lean startup of around 10-50 cheaply made kits, into a huge investment. 
Johanna was also having trouble creating a net from metal that would be harmless when folded and secured in place. Sheet metal is generally quite dangerous, expensive and difficult to fold correctly. 
We then became worried that this scenario would reoccur every month if we didn’t find a solution. After a chat with Ben, ex-foundry member and seasoned product-designer, he suggested that we should stick to a single manufacturing method. That way, we wouldn’t have to deal with several different manufacturing companies and conduct a long list of quotes every time we created a new product. 
A single method, such as laser cutting, would simplify the process. Then, we would think of the lesson we’d like to teach, think of the medium/toy to teach it, and then see how we can construct it from flat pieces and store-bought components.  
This also makes producing different iterations of the product quicker as it would involve editing a net on Adobe Illustrator and sending to the machine again. 
This also eliminated the problem of bulky parts fitting into the “Large Letter” sized box we’ve created, but we’ll see what the future throws at us. 
Now our plan is to create a neat laser-cut version from wood which is still fun to create and play with. 
The mechanism is being discussed- motors are an option, though electricity and water is a nono. We’ve seen balloon-powered propulsion but everyone thinks it’s not the most elegant solution. Elastic-powered boats are charming in their own way though kinetic energy runs out fairly quickly.
The direction we’re going for seems to be a New Orleans style paddle steamer. Tomorrow morning we should see the first prototype. 
ZoomInfo
Pic: The paper prototype for a tin put-put boat.
After a group chat, we noticed there were very steep obstacles to tackle when dealing with the put-put boat kit. 
The fire problem was first shrugged off because of the presence of water while the boat was in use.
Then our product designer Shim started calling manufacturers who specialised in diecutting, stamping and water cutting so we could produce foldable metal nets in tin/aluminium. One of the quotes for 1000 minimum quantity was £4.50pp  (est.) When we enquired about making a single diecutting tool for the net, they quoted us £2,100 estimate. This was becoming less of a lean startup of around 10-50 cheaply made kits, into a huge investment. 
Johanna was also having trouble creating a net from metal that would be harmless when folded and secured in place. Sheet metal is generally quite dangerous, expensive and difficult to fold correctly. 
We then became worried that this scenario would reoccur every month if we didn’t find a solution. After a chat with Ben, ex-foundry member and seasoned product-designer, he suggested that we should stick to a single manufacturing method. That way, we wouldn’t have to deal with several different manufacturing companies and conduct a long list of quotes every time we created a new product. 
A single method, such as laser cutting, would simplify the process. Then, we would think of the lesson we’d like to teach, think of the medium/toy to teach it, and then see how we can construct it from flat pieces and store-bought components.  
This also makes producing different iterations of the product quicker as it would involve editing a net on Adobe Illustrator and sending to the machine again. 
This also eliminated the problem of bulky parts fitting into the “Large Letter” sized box we’ve created, but we’ll see what the future throws at us. 
Now our plan is to create a neat laser-cut version from wood which is still fun to create and play with. 
The mechanism is being discussed- motors are an option, though electricity and water is a nono. We’ve seen balloon-powered propulsion but everyone thinks it’s not the most elegant solution. Elastic-powered boats are charming in their own way though kinetic energy runs out fairly quickly.
The direction we’re going for seems to be a New Orleans style paddle steamer. Tomorrow morning we should see the first prototype. 
ZoomInfo

Pic: The paper prototype for a tin put-put boat.

After a group chat, we noticed there were very steep obstacles to tackle when dealing with the put-put boat kit. 

The fire problem was first shrugged off because of the presence of water while the boat was in use.

Then our product designer Shim started calling manufacturers who specialised in diecutting, stamping and water cutting so we could produce foldable metal nets in tin/aluminium. One of the quotes for 1000 minimum quantity was £4.50pp  (est.) When we enquired about making a single diecutting tool for the net, they quoted us £2,100 estimate. This was becoming less of a lean startup of around 10-50 cheaply made kits, into a huge investment. 

Johanna was also having trouble creating a net from metal that would be harmless when folded and secured in place. Sheet metal is generally quite dangerous, expensive and difficult to fold correctly. 

We then became worried that this scenario would reoccur every month if we didn’t find a solution. After a chat with Ben, ex-foundry member and seasoned product-designer, he suggested that we should stick to a single manufacturing method. That way, we wouldn’t have to deal with several different manufacturing companies and conduct a long list of quotes every time we created a new product. 

A single method, such as laser cutting, would simplify the process. Then, we would think of the lesson we’d like to teach, think of the medium/toy to teach it, and then see how we can construct it from flat pieces and store-bought components.  

This also makes producing different iterations of the product quicker as it would involve editing a net on Adobe Illustrator and sending to the machine again. 

This also eliminated the problem of bulky parts fitting into the “Large Letter” sized box we’ve created, but we’ll see what the future throws at us. 

Now our plan is to create a neat laser-cut version from wood which is still fun to create and play with.

The mechanism is being discussed- motors are an option, though electricity and water is a nono. We’ve seen balloon-powered propulsion but everyone thinks it’s not the most elegant solution. Elastic-powered boats are charming in their own way though kinetic energy runs out fairly quickly.

The direction we’re going for seems to be a New Orleans style paddle steamer. Tomorrow morning we should see the first prototype.